It’s often overlooked in the job application process; but have you ever stopped to think what your email address is saying about you? We’ve seen a range of email address faux pas. From the unintentionally irreverent to the politically incorrect.. to just not having one at all!


The unprofessional email


We’ve all had that email address. The one created in the 1990s when AOL was still relevant. Email was a fun novelty and we created ‘witty’ novelty email addresses for it. Let’s face it, no one is going to hire The best thing about email is that IT’S FREE! So time to give up for a more professional choice.


The work email

First rule of thumb when you decide to look for a new job – don’t do it from your current job! And certainly don’t use your current work email address. Job searching should be all on your personal time from a personal email. Using your work email not only risks your current employer finding out you’re looking to leave, but it also signals to anyone reading your resume that you’re not a respectful employee.


The hard to spell email

There are lots of complicated names out there. In our Vancouver office, our very own Chaminda Jayashanka Wijesundera’s claim to fame is that his name “is longer than the alphabet”! While we always recommend you try using your full name for your email address, try to keep it as simple as possible and use a shortened, easy to spell variation, for example


The unintentionally inappropriate email

While we’re on the topic of using your real name or variation of it, be careful that it it’s not unintentionally inappropriate when mashed together as an email address. ‘Community’ actor, Donald Glover, had this problem when choosing a Twitter handle. At the time @donaldglover had already been taken by his dad, so he went with @donglover. Unfortunately he later realised this could be misread as something totally different! Luckily he’s since convinced his dad to hand over the @donaldglover handle.


The ‘I don’t have my own email’ email

Not everyone is vigilant about checking their email regularly; it may be your least preferred form of contact. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have one at all. Sending your resume from your partner’s email address is unprofessional and a red flag in this ‘tech savvy’ era.


The politically incorrect email


Like your resume, keep your email address free from all connotations of your age, your race, your gender and your political affiliations – period.


The Resume Ready Email

This is the email we like to see. Simple, professional and relevant. Use your name or variation of your name whenever possible. Add some non-descript numbers, periods, or underscores if you have to.


The job search email


They’re not often come by, but sometimes we’ll see the odd job search specific email address. A job seeker will set up a separate email account dedicated to their job search. It can be a general job search address like, or highlight your specialty Some job seekers will even mount full ‘hire me’ campaigns aimed at their dream employer.